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Can Women With Lymphoma Become Pregnant? - Dr. Rosen (VIDEO)

By Dr. Steven Rosen Expert
 
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More Videos from Dr. Steven Rosen 28 videos in this series

Can Women With Lymphoma Become Pregnant? - Dr. Rosen (VIDEO)
Can Women With Lymphoma Become Pregnant? - Dr. Rosen (VIDEO)
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Dr. Rosen shares if a woman can become pregnant once diagnosed with lymphoma.

Dr. Rosen:
So, an individual who is pre-menopausal, who is diagnosed with a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma can still become pregnant if treated with chemotherapy. Now, depending on the age of the individual and the types of drugs that are used, the therapy itself may lead to a post-menopausal state.

If the woman stops having menses that does not necessarily mean that she is not capable of becoming pregnant, and so appropriate birth control is indicated.

One of the most important initiatives we have at Northwestern is our onco-fertility program for women who are seeking, and desire to have a child. After the therapy, we address this issue before initiating treatment so that we can maximize the potential for a woman to have a child following her treatment.

About Dr. Steven Rosen, M.D., F.A.C.P:
Steven Rosen, M.D., F.A.C.P., is Genevieve Teuton Professor of Medicine, at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University and Director of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University and Director of Cancer Programs at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Following his graduation with distinction from Northwestern University Medical School's Six-Year Honors Program in 1976, Dr. Rosen completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Northwestern and a fellowship in Medical Oncology at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Rosen's laboratory research focuses on experimental therapeutics and hematologic malignancies.

Visit Dr. Rosen at Northwestern Memorial Hospital

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