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New Rape Laws: 8 Things You Should Know About College Campus Rape

By HERWriter Guide
 
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New Rape Laws: 8 Things to Know About College Campus Rape Auremar/PhotoSpin

Colleges and universities have come under attack in recent years regarding their policies on rape. Some college sports stars and their coaches got away with sexual assault, and are guilty of looking the other way when it came to the sexual abuse of others.

And it’s not just sports stars who are guilty of rape. Many college students have had to live with a kind of rape culture where rape was considered more a private matter. Victims were supposed to put up with these dangers on campuses throughout the country and not rock the boat.

Some victims were penalized for speaking out, especially if the perpetrator was a star athlete.

In an effort to improve on the “no means no” mindset, the California senate has approved a “yes means yes” law that changes the premise of consensual sex and forces administrators to adopt better medical, emotional and legal support for survivors of sexual abuse.

Gov. Jerry Brown (D) has until the end of September to decide whether or not he will sign the bill into law.

Other states may adopt similar policies.

Here’s what you need to know about rape on college campuses:

1) One in 20 women on college campuses in the United States will be raped or will have been subject to an attempt of rape every year. One in four college women report that they have been sexually abused at some point in their lives.

2) Sorority women are 74 percent more likely to be raped than non-sorority women. Sorority sisters who live in a sorority house are three times more likely to be raped than those not living in a sorority house. Two longitudinal studies found that men who join fraternities are three times more likely to rape than those who do not join a fraternity.

3) Over 50 colleges and universities are under scrutiny for possibly violating federal laws concerning policy and procedure regarding campus rape and sexual assault. They are accused of not providing the proper care, concern, legal and medical assistance for rape and sexual assault.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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