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10 Myths About Masturbation

By HERWriter
 
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Masturbation is a natural sexual practice. In fact, May is known as National Masturbation Month. Still, many are raised believing certain myths about masturbation said About.com. Here’s a look at the truth.

Myth #1:
Masturbation is for the young.
Masturbation is a lifelong sexual activity. About.com reported surveys regularly show 70 to 95 percent of adult men and women masturbate.

Myth #2:
Masturbation causes blindness, acne, hair loss, chronic fatigue, hairy palms or cancer.

Not true. In fact, doctors say masturbation has medical benefits, wrote Seventeen.com. It can relieve stress, insomnia, headaches, PMS and menstrual cramps.

Myth #3:
Masturbation isn't real sex.
When people masturbate, they can get really aroused, which can result in very real orgasms, said About.com. From a health perspective, masturbation is as “real” a sexual activity as intercourse, oral sex or kissing.

Myth #4:
People in relationships don’t masturbate.
WebMD reported people in relationships actually masturbate more often than those who aren’t.

Myth #5:
Men have to masturbate; women don’t.
While most statistics show men masturbate more than women, said About.com, there’s no evidence suggesting this is due to a male biological need.

Myth #6:
Masturbation ruins how other kinds of sex feels.
Planned Parenthood wrote masturbation can help other kinds of sex feel better, not worse. It’s about discovering what touching and sensations work for each individual. And it helps learn how to orgasm.

Myth #7:
Only certain kinds of people masturbate.
Not true according to About.com and WebMD. Masturbation is not for the "simple-minded," the antisocial, or the immature. According to DivineCaroline.com, people with healthy attitudes towards sex are likely to masturbate at least occasionally.

Myth #8:
It's more acceptable for boys to masturbate than girls.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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