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Male Reproductive Disorder: Growths on the Penis

By HERWriter
 
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Medical providers stress that unusual bumps on the penis usually fall into one of three categories. They are caused by injury, they are normal, or they are growths. And the frequency of these conditions occurs in that same order according to Columbia University’s Go Ask Alice column.

The most common cause of change in genital skin is injury. It’s not unusual for bruises, nicks, bites, abrasions or bumps to appear after close or vigorous contacts of all kinds.

Normal (and harmless) bumps on the penis include sebaceous glands. Avert.org, an international HIV & AIDS charity, wrote sebaceous glands are usually attached to hair follicles.

KidsHealth.org added that little white bumps on the penile shaft may be pimples or ingrown hairs. These are also common and no cause for concern.

Another condition that's normal and no cause for concern is pearly penile papules. About.com said pearly penile papules are small round bumps that can be the color of the skin, translucent, white, yellow, or pink. The bumps can sometimes wrap all around the rim of the head of the penis, and also can form multiple rows.

Peyronie's disease is another condition in which a plaque, or hard lump, forms on the penis, wrote Cleveland Clinic. These growths may develop on the upper or lower side of the penis.

Merck Manuals reported growths on the penis are sometimes caused by sexually transmitted disease (STD) or infection. One example is syphilis which may cause flat, pink or gray growths.

Another STD that stems from a strain of human papillomavirus (HPV) is genital warts. Genital warts can be painless, clustered, and cauliflower-like growths that show up on the penis.

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) warned that benign genital warts on the penis may become cancerous if not treated. Penile cancer is rare however. Most forms of it develop from skin cells called squamous cells.

Squamous cells can develop anywhere on the penis, but most commonly occur on the foreskin in uncircumcised men or on the glans (the tip of the penis).

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EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Great collection of information!

In health,
Alice

April 24, 2012 - 12:25pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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