Facebook Pixel

The Medical Necessity of Sex

 
Rate This

High blood pressure has been a long-running problem for Brazilians, affecting up to 25 percent of the population at any given time. This week, Brazil’s Minister of Health decided that something needed to be done, so he released a decree throughout the country. His advice? Have more sex!

The recommended “dose” for Brazilians is five sexual experiences per week. This amount, medical experts believe, is the minimum required to achieve noticeable benefits from arousal and orgasm. And what, exactly, are those benefits?

To start with, sex is obviously a physical activity that requires movement and strength. Actions such as initiating friction, maintaining particular positions, and achieving orgasm all require energy and calories to complete. And sex, like any other form of exercise, strengthens the immune system and thus has the immediate ability to cure headaches and relieve sinus pressure.

Secondly, regular sexual activity has been shown to decrease blood pressure over time. "But for this to happen," clarified sex therapist and marriage counselor Israel Helfand, "it must be done vigorously." It also increases production of the body’s “happy” hormones, including dopamine and cortisol. This improves mood, fends off depression, and provides extra energy.

The final set of benefits embodies a more holistic view of bodily health. "People who have healthy sex lives are likely to have healthier lives overall," said Ian Kerner, Ph.D., a certified clinical sexologist. "People who have sex more often are more likely to go to the gym, eat healthy, and take care of themselves."

Indeed, the physical rewards of regular sexual activity inspire passion, motivation, and positivity – the perfect foundation for overall life-long health. In fact, a recent study published in the British Medical Journal (reported on ABC News) revealed that, of 6,000 Americans ages 25 to 84, those with an active sex life lead healthier and longer lives.

This has important implications for women who suffer from low libido.

Add a CommentComments

There are no comments yet. Be the first one and get the conversation started!

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Sexual Health

Get Email Updates

Resource Centers

Related Checklists

Sexual Health Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.

ASK

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!