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Myths About Sex After Pregnancy

By HERWriter
 
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Lisa Masterson is an OB/GYN who also hosts "The Doctors". She figures it's time to dispel some myths about sex after pregnancy.

It's true that women should wait four to six weeks after giving birth to engage in sexual intercourse. Women who had a cesarean section also need time to heal before engaging in sex after pregnancy.

It is true that women may have pain during sex after pregnancy. Delivery is a trauma to the body and the body needs time to heal after giving birth. But it's not true that women can't experience the same satisfaction from sex after pregnancy that they had before the baby came. Once again, the body just needs time to heal after giving birth.

It's not true that a woman who is breastfeeding can't become pregnant. Says Masterson, "And that's why we have the six-week appointment. Before we free you up to have sex again or give you the prescription to your husband saying no, basically we go over contraception. And that is key because there are a lot, so many moms who think that's protective over contraception. So absolutely a myth."

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/05/22/earlyshow/health/main6508983.shtml

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EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

"...give you the prescription to your husband saying no, basically we go over contraception." What does that mean? A prescription to your husband saying 'no'?? That's just incoherent. "...so many moms who think that's protective over contraception. So absolutely a myth." - is she speaking about breastfeeding? Because that is NOT a myth; that is science. Mothers who are nursing exclusively will not ovulate. The trick is being sure that you are nursing enough - and definitely through the night. The minute your baby eases up things can change hormonally so you can't rely 100% on this method. But I would not call it a "myth" - not by any stretch.

May 24, 2010 - 5:47pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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