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You've Come a Long Way, Baby: Smoking, Libido and Your Sex Life

 
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Virginia Slims (brand) sexualized cigarettes for decades, on the premise that women can smoke to express their unique independence. Ironically, millions of individuals began smoking Virginia Slims to express their...individuality?!

Smoking is still depicted in movies with a rebellious “crazy, sexy, cool” vibe, although current college students are not buying it. In fact, most college students are choosing not to smoke in large numbers (up to 70-80 percent of college students are choosing not to smoke). Additionally, students are also reporting a strong preference for dating someone who also does not smoke. [Source: BACCHUS & GAMMA]

It seems as though the “sexy factor” in cigarettes are no longer as desirable.

This trend may have to do with a more educated generation, as studies are discovering the possible effects of carbon monoxide from the cigarettes as affecting the production of testosterone, a necessary hormone for both gender's libido, or sex drive.

The harmful effects of smoking are clearly not depicted on the movie screen, but can be seen (and felt) in the bedroom. Smoking can lower chances for a man to get, and sustain, an erection. For women, smoking can lower her ability for the vagina to self-lubricate, making sex uncomfortable or even painful.

Smoking Effects in the Bedroom for Women:

  • Reduced fertility: “Smoking one pack of cigarettes per day and starting to smoke before 18 years of age were further associated with an increased risk of infertility, providing evidence of dose- and age-related effects on natural fertility.” [Source: Medscape.com]
  • Menstrual cycle irregularities or absence of menstruation
  • Menopause reached one or two years earlier: “It is well accepted that menopause occurs earlier in current smokers than in women who have never smoked (Baron et al., 1990; Cooper et al., 1999).”
  • Increased risk of cancer of the cervix
  • Greatly increased risk of stroke and heart attack if the smoker is aged over 35 years and taking the oral contraceptive pill.

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wew! i didn't know all this.. i'm 23 years of age, and i just started smoking last year.. i was addicted with smokes for a while but now im starting to control and lesser my smoking after i was admitted in the hosp. for gastric reflux and other complication.. is there anything that we can take or any medications that could help lessen the effect of smoking or that would cleanse our lungs? im worried more on my husband, he smokes a lot and finds it hard to control it, even i can control him..

August 23, 2010 - 7:13am
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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