Facebook Pixel

Secondhand Smoke Affects Young Girls More Than Boys - HER Daily Dose

Rate This

More Videos from Bailey Mosier 30 videos in this series

In this edition of EmpowHER's "HER Daily Dose" Bailey Mosier looks at a study that claims that young girls are affected by secondhand smoke more than boys.

Hi, I’m Bailey Mosier. This is your EmpowHER HER Daily Dose.

Recent research found that lung function among children exposed to secondhand smoke was six times worse in girls than in boys.

University of Cincinnati researchers looked at 476 children and found that those who were exposed to high levels of secondhand smoke and also had allergic sensitizations at age 2 were at higher risk for decreased lung function at age 7.

The researchers say this association between secondhand smoke and lung function loss in boys and girls is ultimately dependent on timing and other factors such as asthma status, genetic susceptibility and sex hormones.

That wraps up your EmpowHER HER Daily Dose. Join me here at EmpowHER.com every weekday for your next dose of women’s health.

Add a CommentComments

There are no comments yet. Be the first one and get the conversation started!

Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy


Get Email Updates

Addictions Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.


Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!