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Competitive Edge Causing Spike in Cosmetic Surgery

By Bailey Mosier
 
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When the economy tanked in 2008, people everywhere tightened their budgets.

Last year and so far in 2011, people everywhere are now tightening their faces.

Money spent on beauty maintenance was among the first luxuries to go when the market crashed at the end of 2008, but as CNN Money reported, cosmetic surgeries are on the rise in today’s landscape.

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), more than 13 million cosmetic plastic surgeries were performed in the U.S. during 2010, up 5 percent from 2009. A similar organization – the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) – reported a plastic surgery increase of 9 percent or 1.6 million surgeries from 2009 to 2010.

Both the ASPS and ASAPS are worldwide specialty plastic surgery organizations that aim to advance quality care to plastic surgery patients by encouraging high standards of training, ethics, physician practice and research in plastic surgery.

The reason for the hike in plastic surgery when the economy has far from recovered?

The answer is a competitive edge.

Phillip Haeck, president of the ASPS, said he has noticed a sharp increase in plastic surgeries in his own practice, and that much of his business comes from older women and men who are concerned about keeping their jobs.

There are pressures today that didn’t exist when jobs were plentiful. It’s the widespread belief that you have to be the very best you can be now, more so than ever before, and that your image is a significant factor.

One plastic surgeon, Dr. Frederick Lukash, told the Long Island Business News that he’s not surprised of the increase.

“Everybody does it to look better. The motivations vary. Some feel good, but don’t look good. Their chronological age exceeds the way they feel about themselves,” Lukash said. “Some people try to stay competitive in the job market. It’s a younger world. They figure if they can revitalize themselves, they stand a better chance.”

He also added that some people do it because they are at a new phase of their lives.

“They’re widowed or divorced and looking for a fresh start,” Lukash said.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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