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National Women's Health Week: Women's Dental Care Is Important

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The disparity between women’s and men's dental health is nothing new. Increasing studies show that poor oral health puts women at the center of many predisposed health conditions that can be life-altering.

A combination of biological factors, along with neglect of care, makes women more susceptible to decayed and lost teeth, and periodontal disease.

“Women experience higher rates of decayed or missing teeth, and are also more likely to experience more severe decay than men,” says Dr. Leslie Townsend, DDS., Regional Dental Director for Jefferson Dental Clinics. “What’s most alarming is how oral health impacts women’s over overall health.”

There are several reasons that women experience worse dental health than men. One significant factor is hormones, a major cause of periodontal disease which is characterized by chronically irritated and inflamed gums.

Women are most susceptible to oral health issues during periods of hormonal fluctuation: during puberty, throughout pregnancy, with the use of birth control pills, during pregnancy and menopause. Uncontrolled periodontal disease can lead to gum recession, and eventual tooth loss.

Another major risk-factor is that millions of women do not receive proper dental care. Combined with biological factors, neglect of oral health is a quick route to developing tooth decay, gum disease and other oral health conditions.

“It’s not just about aesthetics, the health of the mouth has been linked to cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, hypertension and dozens of other diseases,” says Dr. Leslie Townsend DDS of the Jefferson Dental Clinic.

Illnesses that are more prevalent in women, such as osteoporosis and breast cancer, have been linked to poor oral health. Periodontal disease is a common complaint in pregnant women that often is overlooked.

Researchers have even found that poor oral health in pregnancy has been linked to pre-term birth and low birth rates. Despite these risks, only around 20-30 percent of women visit the dentist during pregnancy.

“Routine dental care is simple, however women have to make their health a top priority,” Townsend says.

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Great read! Thank you for including a wellness visit with your dental hygienist as part of the well-woman visits that are celebrated this week! #NWHW
View my vlog that shares this information also! https://youtu.be/3gRR4Rs2Xik

May 15, 2016 - 11:33am
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