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Female Sexual Dysfunction Guide

Rosa Cabrera RN

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A Look at the Pink Pill

By Shaina Gaul
 
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The pink pill, also known as female Viagra, has generated a lot of buzz in the news in recent years. While scientists continue to tweak the formula and conduct experiments, those of us waiting with bated breath can speculate on the pros and cons of such a drug.

Pro: It can improve circulation and provide energy for women with certain diseases.
Women who suffer from common conditions such as diabetes, cancer, hypertension, heart disease, neurological diseases, thyroid disorders, and autoimmune disorders like lupus can definitely stand to benefit from the pink pill. The drug can help to treat biological issues resulting from major health problems.

Con: It can’t treat the primary cause of sexual dysfunction in women: desire.
According to Sandra Lieblum, director for sexual and marital health at the UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, N.J., "What the genitals are doing may play a less important role in how a woman defines her sexual arousal. I don't think there will ever be an aphrodisiac that will make [women] want to have sex all the time."

Pro: You won’t have to worry about the sexual side effects of your medications.
The pink pill has one huge benefit: the ability to counteract the loss of libido incurred as a result of certain medications. Women robbed of their mojo by prescription medicines like anti-hypertensives and anti-depressants can expect to receive much-needed relief from female Viagra.

Con: Affordability may prevent widespread use of the pink pill.
Drug companies pay researchers (and study volunteers) inordinate sums of money to develop medication that meets FDA standards. They then pay millions of dollars to advertise those medications (Zyrtec, anyone?). All of this means that once a drug finally hits the market, companies are pushing hard to sell, sell, sell. Women's sexual health products also have a long history of being controversial (birth control, the morning-after pill, etc.) which may prevent them from being covered by insurance plans.

Pro: The road to orgasm will likely be much easier.

Would you use a so-called Pink Pill -- or pill designed to boost sexual arousal and satisfaction for women?
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Add a Comment6 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

I am a 36 y/o diagnosed with three of the common medical conditions listed above, Lupus being the biggest. I am truly interested in such a product if it ever becomes available. I'm still considered "young" and I have a "younger" husband. Low libido and vaginal dryness is a major issue for me and a major turn-off for him. However, with the ga-zillion medications I take DAILY (some twice a day), I have no control of my sexual health.
I am totally interested and looking forward to approval.

October 8, 2010 - 7:42pm
Pat Elliott HERWriter Guide

Anon - You raise some good questions, and others have too, including the FDA. You may find the following article of interest: http://www.empowher.com/female-sexual-challenges/content/viagra-women-ra...

July 20, 2010 - 5:06pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

I am concerned that no information is given as to the components of the Pink Pill. As with so many other sex related products from Big Pharma
for women, our endrocrine systems are altered in ways that may not ever
be re-balanced. ( Birth control places a woman in a menopausal state
with all it's accompanying problems, and many women are left unable to conceive when they choose. Chemical stimulation usually has negative
side effects whether admitted or not.)
Since we all remain "the guinea pigs" once a company markets a "drug"
the initial study side effects are well worth knowing.
More comprehensive information please.

July 20, 2010 - 2:49pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Please change the words "begs the question" to the phrase "raises the question," in order to quit offending those of us who care about logic and language.

June 30, 2010 - 9:49pm
Pat Elliott HERWriter Guide

Anon - No, this is not a site that has anything to do with any drug companies or market research firms. If you take the time to look around you will find a full spectrum of women's health issues are addressed by and for women. http://www.empowher.com/company

June 19, 2010 - 12:24pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

so is this site just set up by drug companies for market research?

I've stumbled on 3 different Empowher pages that were strictly about this little pink pill. F*** this pill and f*** your site. I don't feel empowered I feel marketed too in the skeeziest way.

(Comment edited by EmpowHER moderator for inappropriate language.)

June 19, 2010 - 12:11pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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