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7 Overlooked Endocrine Causes of Fatigue

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fatigue David Castillo Dominici/PhotoSpin

Many patients suffer with fatigue and are told that there is nothing to do for it. Here are 7 endocrine causes of fatigue that are often overlooked.

1) Low aldosterone

Aldosterone is a salt-regulating hormone made by the adrenal glands. Patients with low aldosterone have low blood pressure and don’t get enough blood going to the brain causing fatigue. Have your doctor measure your serum aldosterone level. If it’s less than 5 ng/dL, you may have an aldosterone deficiency. Treatment includes consuming more salt or eating licorice or grapefruits, although some patients may need synthetic aldosterone called fludrocortisone.

2) Low ferritin

Ferritin measures iron stores and is a more sensitive marker of low iron stores than either a CBC (complete blood count) or iron levels. Optimal ferritin levels are around 70 ng/mL. Those with low levels often don’t get enough blood going to their brain and they feel tired. Iron is also needed for thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Those with low levels of ferritin should take iron pills.

3) Growth hormone deficiency

Growth hormone (GH) is made by the pituitary and adults need GH as well as children. Adults with low GH have loss of muscle, accumulation of fat, especially in the abdomen, psychological changes, joint pain, poor sleep and pronounced fatigue. Growth hormone deficiency usually occurs in patients with pituitary problems and is diagnosed by a stimulation test to see if the pituitary makes GH such as a glucagon stimulation test.

4) Menopause

Women undergoing a drop in their estrogen levels due to menopause often feel extremely tired. Women with irregular or no menses and hot flashes should have a day 3 FSH and estradiol measured. If the FSH is high and estradiol is low, treatment with estrogen patches or creams plus progesterone can often help the fatigue.

5) Cushing’s syndrome

This relatively rare condition is probably underdiagnosed and occurs in people with either a pituitary or less often an adrenal tumor that causes the body to make too much cortisol.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.


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