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What’s in Your Kids’ Lunch Boxes?

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What’s in Your Child's Lunch Box? MonkeyBusiness Images/PhotoSpin

You start off the new school with good intentions, but it doesn't take long before packing creative and wholesome lunches for Johnny and Sue becomes a daunting exercise. Before long, you’re feeling accomplished when you throw some PBJs and chips in a sack before mad-dashing your children out the door.

The key to filling a lunch box with nutritious foods essential for healthy growth and weight maintenance is a little planning, says Dr. Leila T. Beker, a registered dietitian with the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. She’s also a mother and grandmother.

Beker advises to start the planning process by thinking about what fruits, vegetables, dairy, lean protein and whole grains for fiber your family will eat for the entire week so you can shop and have those wholesome foods on hand.

A big step toward a healthy lunch box is reading the Nutrition Facts label for sources of fats and sugars in the food. Some foods you might not expect are packed full of extra calories.

“You have to have a strategy for a healthy life, week by week,” Beker says. “If that task is too daunting, start smaller by planning lunch for a day or two and progress from there. Then duplicate that meal plan for the next week and build on it.”

Getting your kids involved in helping to pack their lunches and planning family meals helps them develop good habits that last a lifetime and takes some stress off you.

“If your approach to each day is to grab food on the go, that can become a problem. If you don’t plan, you become a victim of convenient foods,” she said.

Need some help in meal planning? MyPlate Kids’ Place has recipes and meal-planning tips geared to different age groups. It also has advice on making healthy meals, cooking at home and developing healthy eating habits.

Studies show that children will eat more fruits and vegetables if you make them interesting, says Shirley Blakely, senior dietitian with FDA’s Office of Nutrition, Labeling & Dietary Supplements.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.


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