Hide This

FREEHER HealthToolkit

HER Health Toolkit

Sign up for EmpowHER updates and you'll receive our
FREE HER Health Toolkit

Parenting

Get Email Updates

Parenting Guide

Alison Beaver

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.

ASK

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!

The Benefits of Being Child-Free

By MC Kelby HERWriter
 
Rate This
The Benefits of Being Child-Free 0 5
there are benefits to being child-free
Auremar/PhotoSpin

This year, I saw a plethora of my friends drive their children to college and say good-bye as their kids left the family nest. I know that will never be me.

Ever since I can remember, I really believed I wanted to have children. In my twenties and thirties, I searched high and low for my perfect match but with no success.

Fortunately for me, the men in my past life were duds and they would have made terrible long-term partners, not to mention fathers. While I honor and respect single mothers and fathers, the idea of “bringing up baby” solo was not for me.

At the ripe old age of 40, I finally found the right partner. We did our very best to have a family but it wasn’t in the cards for us.

We discussed adoption but most adoption agencies frown upon parents past a certain age and the cost of infertility treatments was out of our budget. Also, my husband had already tried the infertility route with his first wife and it was unsuccessful and costly.

I have never lost a night of sleep thinking about the failure to have a child.

Recently, a female friend of mine died suddenly from a brain tumor. She was 40 and a nurse. When she was healthy, she regretted not having children. But, before she died, she was grateful that she wasn’t leaving behind a young child.

The Kaiser Family Foundation stated that “the average bill for doctors’ fees and hospital charges runs around $9,700 for a normal delivery and roughly $12,500 for a cesarean section.” And, after you take the child home, the financial meter is running.

According to Parenting.com, parents will spend $50 a week on diapers. Plus parents will spend more money on toys, clothing, furniture, and items for child-proofing their home.

CNN stated that the cost of raising a child to the age of 18 is $241,080. If you add in tuition to Harvard, add another $250,000 dollars for an undergraduate degree.

Psychology Today and AllWomenStalk.com said the following were benefits of being child-free:

• Sleeping late

• Time and energy for your own pursuits

• No worrying about a child who is dependent on you

• Flexibility

• Looking younger

Add a Comment1 Comments

Susan Cody HERWriter Guide

I like this - a parent (a good one) has to indeed sacrifice a lot when raising kids. And the financial cost is unbelievable. Not all people are up for this.  I wouldn't say the fear of dying young is much of a reason for not having kids though - that mindset would limit us from so much!

I know many people without kids (who won't have any) and there is much to envy at times! They have the same feelings too sometimes, about parents. It takes all sorts and to NOT have children knowing you'd wouldn't have your heart in the right place is the right thing to do. Too many parents had their kids for all the wrong reasons and it shows.

Susan

September 16, 2013 - 3:29pm
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Improved

1794 Health

Changed

695 Lives

Saved

556 Lives
5 lives impacted in the last 24 hrs Learn More

Take Our Featured Health Poll

Do your teens have their own cellphones?:
View Results