Facebook Pixel

Teens and Technology: Managing Cell Phone Usage

Rate This
managing teen cell phone usage Scott Griessel-Creatista/PhotoSpin

Everyone has a cell phone. At least, that’s what your teenager says to you during his/her constant pleas to have his/her own phone. One of the biggest questions making the rounds among parents of tweens and teens is not if, but when, to get your child a mobile device.

Teen cell phone usage continues to make headlines, from teen sexting bringing to light an old Massachusetts law which makes sexting a felony, to stories of how teens’ late night usage of cell phones could lead to mental health problems. On the one hand, parents like the thought of being able to reach their kids at any time; on the other hand, cell phones bring a whole slew of issues to the parenting realm that many parents, much less children, are prepared for.

The majority of teenagers and parents report feeling safer when teenagers have their own cell phones because of GPS features, which allow parents to know where teens are, and also serve as insurance against abduction because of tracking capability. That said, if your child needs a phone for emergency, there should be restrictions in place for usage, and there should be consequences prepared for ahead of time if your child breaks one of the golden rules.

If you decide to allow your child to have his/her own cell phone, whether in middle school or high school, here are some helpful guidelines to keep in mind.

Remember that tweens and teens with cell phones are still children. If you decide to give a tween or a teen a cell phone, you must remember that the brain of this child isn’t yet done forming.

Add a CommentComments

There are no comments yet. Be the first one and get the conversation started!

Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.



Get Email Updates

Parenting Guide

HERWriter Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.


Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!