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Pregnancy Guide

Alison Beaver

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How To Deal With A High-Risk Pregnancy

By womenshealth.gov
 
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Pregnancies with a greater chance of complications are called "high-risk." But this doesn't mean there will be problems.

The following factors may increase the risk of problems during pregnancy:

- Very young age or older than 35

- Overweight or underweight

- Problems in previous pregnancy

- Health conditions you have before you become pregnant, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, cancer, and HIV.

- Pregnancy with twins or other multiples

Health problems also may develop during a pregnancy that make it high-risk, such as gestational diabetes or preeclampsia.

See Pregnancy complications to learn more.

Women with high-risk pregnancies need prenatal care more often and sometimes from a specially trained doctor.

A maternal-fetal medicine specialist is a medical doctor that cares for high-risk pregnancies.

If your pregnancy is considered high risk, you might worry about your unborn baby's health and have trouble enjoying your pregnancy.

Share your concerns with your doctor.

Your doctor can explain your risks and the chances of a real problem.

Also, be sure to follow your doctor's advice. For example, if your doctor tells you to take it easy, then ask your partner, family members, and friends to help you out in the months ahead.

You will feel better knowing that you are doing all you can to care for your unborn baby.

For more resources on pregnancy click here.

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