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Vitamin D May Be What More Expecting Moms Need

By Nina Jacinto
 
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Everyone's always trying to tell pregnant women how to eat, how to sleep, and what to do to make themselves as healthy as possible. Now a new study urges many pregnant women to do what we probably should all do - consume vitamin D.

Not just a regular dose - according to CNN, but pregnant women should consume 10 times more vitamin D than the current guidelines dictate. This news dovetails with another recent study that concluded that babies need a lot of vitamin D as well.

In the past, doctors have been concerned that too much vitamin D consumed while pregnant may lead to birth defects. The new research suggests the exact opposite. The National Institutes of Health looked at 500 women who took various levels of vitamin D: 400 IU, 2,000 IU or 4,000 IU. The women who took the highest dosage were least likely to have premature labor, premature babies or develop infections.

Vitamin D is having its 15 minutes of fame - recently studies have shown links to vitamin D deficiency and heart disease, certain types of cancers, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

So how do we make sure we're getting enough D? Well, probably the most delightful way is the sun. Make sure your whole body is covered in sunscreen (especially your face and other exposed areas) and spend a little bit of time in the sun every day. It's difficult in the winter, and for many professionals who spend most of their days in an office. But taking the time out to enjoy the outdoors, be in the sun and soak in vitamin D can improve your overall mental and physical health. Just watch out for sun burns and take preventative care against skin cancer.

For those expecting women however, the sun alone will not do. Taking supplements, available now at most natural health and grocery stores, will help you get the right amount of vitamin D into your system.

Another point of caution - take all studies with a grain of salt! At the end of the day, it's best to consult your health professional and your obstetrician or midwife to see what is the best way to keep your baby healthy and your pregnancy as smooth and healthy as possible.

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EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

The information re: pregnancy and the beyond vital importance of healthy amounts of vitamin D was released last year. Only now is it gaining wide circulation and perhaps 100-200,000 babies and pregnant mothers have suffered the consequences of deficiency in the interim. Oh what misery might have been saved?

This finding is not even a millionth of the applicability of vitamin D in human health. Whether or not you are aware it is a fact that all chronic illness must now be examined in terms of vitamin D deficiency. Consdier what the impact of the discovery of infectious microbes must have been like? All of a sudden "doctors" of the period were aware of the primary cause of illness and death. Not that they could do much but attempt to maintain sterile conditions.

In recent decades medicine has been looking for the causes of the civilized world's chronic diseases- cancer- heart disease, diabetes, obesity, autoimmune dysfunction, depression, psychiatric distress, viral scourges, even autism, and produced mostly inadequate and massively expensive "treatments"...until now.

For anyone immersed in this most fascinating mystery the flood of continuous good news re: vitamin D is reason for the most hope, medically speaking, in at least 80 years. Stay tuned and investigate developments because everyone knows someone who is seriously vitamin D deficient!

May 7, 2010 - 4:26pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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