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Ten Sex Myths About Menopause

By HERWriter
 
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There are a number of myths about sex during menopause and then there’s the truth.

Myth #1: Reaching menopause causes most women to lose interest in sex.
Truth: Menopause may bring less estrogen and testosterone but desire doesn’t completely fade away. Some women find their libido increases after menopause since they aren’t worried about contraception.

Myth #2: Sex after menopause will never be as good.
Truth: Many women report they more easily release their fears and insecurities after menopause and are more willing to open and intimate with their partner.

Myth #3: The best doctor for your menopause is the one who delivered your children.
Truth: There are many options for women in menopause. Since it’s a complex area, and things are constantly changing, consider a gynecologist who specializes in menopause.

Myth #4: Estrogen replacement is dangerous.
Truth: Estrogen replacement can be safe for most women. Despite the initial July 2002 results from the Women’s Health Initiative, which found long-term use of hormone therapy poses serious risks and may increase the risk of breast cancer, heart attack and stroke, more studies have since come out challenging those findings.

Myth #5: Use it or lose it.
Truth: There's some truth to this. More frequent vaginal stimulation actually helps increase blood flow around the tissues in this area which can lead to a healthier vaginal wall lining and better ability to lubricate during arousal and sexual activity.

Myth #6: You can't get pregnant during menopause.
Truth: Unless you've gone a full year without a period, you can still get pregnant. It's rare, but it can happen.

Myth #7: There is a decreased risk of getting a STD during menopause.
Fact: Any person, no matter their age or reproductive ability, is capable of getting and spreading sexually transmitted diseases during any type of sexual activity.

Myth #8: As a woman’s reproductive hormone levels drop, so does her sexual activity.
Fact: Sexual activity isn’t just based on hormonal levels. A woman’s lifestyle, emotional and physical health may play an even larger role in her sexual activity than declining hormone levels.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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