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Map to Your Orgasm - Exploring an O!

By HERWriter
 
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We are reaching the end of our holistic bodily tour to the orgasm. We’ve covered a variety of regions: the brain, lips, breasts and clitoris. We have discussed a variety of related topics: the need to feel safe and mentally aroused, the power of reciprocation and communication, the importance of hormones and social cues, and the ability to think of orgasm as an all-encompassing, full body experience that requires creativity, patience and diversity. Now that we have a basic route outlined, we can explore the details of our final hot spot – the vagina and your G-spot.

Important newsflash: anatomically, missionary style penetration is not meant to encourage the female orgasm. Due to the structure and layout of your reproductive organs, missionary sex not only forgoes clitoral stimulation, but also fails to pleasure the most sensitive areas of your vagina. You heard it here, EmpowHER fans – missionary sex was built solely to induce male orgasm, not to benefit the female. So for women who feel as if they are unable to climax or partners frustrated with their inability to invoke orgasms, don’t lose hope! It's possible you just need to change positions.

Once you pass the clitoris and venture into the realm of penetration, the law of real estate becomes exponentially more important – location, location, location! Because of the vagina’s position, squeezed in between the rectum and the bladder, the status of your bowels can affect your ability to have an orgasm. Speaking more candidly – if you haven’t pooped in awhile, your body’s pleasure points will be less accessible, pushed out of easy reach of a penis or other penetrating object. And being able to reach these “pleasure points” is quite important to experiencing a vaginal orgasm.

Different from other erogenous zones, most of the vaginal walls are actually largely insensitive. Only the front portion of your vagina (the part closest to the opening) is reactive, with over 90 percent of vaginal nerve endings packed into this front third.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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