Facebook Pixel

Sex and Heart Disease?

 
Rate This

You might not be comfortable with discussing sex and heart disease with your partner, much less with your doctor. Believe it or not, physicians also might not know much about this area or feel awkward about discussing it with you. Dr.Chapunoff , a cardiologist in private practice in Pompano Beach, Florida, states that doctors don’t have the time or personality to dig into this issue.

Well, should or shouldn’t you have sex when you have heart disease? Is it safe? Is it beneficial? First, remember that sex is a cardiovascular workout. And staying physically active is recommended because it benefits your overall health. Besides, who wouldn’t want to do “this” type of a workout? The other side to sex being a cardiovascular workout is that: it is a work-out, not only for your body but for your heart as well.

After experiencing a heart attack, cardiologists typically advise patients to abstain from sex for a few weeks until they can withstand a cardiac workout. Stress tests , stress echocardiography and frequent physician checkups are recommended. And when cleared, the heart patient is given the OK to resume activities with or without certain restrictions.

The American Heart Association, AHA, has formal guidelines for resuming sexual activity after heart attacks, heart failure, stroke, coronary bypass surgery, etc.:

1. Choose a time when you're rested, relaxed and free from the stress brought on by the day's activities.
2. Wait one to three hours after eating a full meal to allow time for digestion.
3. Select a familiar, peaceful setting that's free from interruptions.
4. If prescribed by your doctor, take medicine before sexual relations.

Add a CommentComments

There are no comments yet. Be the first one and get the conversation started!

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Sexual Health

Get Email Updates

Resource Centers

Related Checklists

Sexual Health Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.

ASK

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!