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Shellac Nail Gel: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

By HERWriter
 
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learn about the good, bad and ugly of Shellac nail gel Digital Vision/Thinkstock

Who wouldn’t want their nail polish to last two or three weeks without chipping, flaking or peeling?

Shellac nail gel is a special nail polish combined with a gel that is supposed to provide you with this type of long-lasting result.

Shellac is the brand name for a product produced by Creative Nail Design (CND). Their Shellac polish can only be bought and applied by a licensed nail salon. However, like any product, there are do-it-yourself versions that can be purchased on the internet.

How it is applied?

Shellac nail gel is applied by brushing on several coats of the polish/gel but between each coat, nails are dried using a hand-size UV light.

Other gel manicures are applied in a two-step process. First, a gel substance is applied to the nail that is filed and shaped. Then nail polish follows to add the color.

Shellac nail gel has combined these two steps by repeatedly having the technician layer the polish/gel combination on to the nail.

How it is removed?

Shellac gel is removed by applying a special acetone wrap to the nails and fingertips to soften the polish so it can be scraped and filed off.

The acetone stays on for about 10 minutes. It is only supposed to be removed by the salon to avoid damaging your nails.

Who is it best suited for?

Shellac is not good for people who have damaged, split or peeling nails. Your nails should be healthy in order to consider using Shellac.

How much does it cost?

Shellac manicures cost $30-40 dollars each time at a salon and $5 to remove the polish.

Now, here is the "Bad and Ugly" part.

According to Good Housekeeping, “Shellac contains methylpyrrolidone, a chemical that is used to dissolve other chemicals. In June 2001, methylpyrrolidone was added to California's Prop 65 list of toxic chemicals as a chemical discovered to cause reproductive toxicity.”

(Note: CND Shella has reported that "As of August 2011, CND Shellac does not contain the chemical Methyl Pyrrolidone (n-MP").

Add a Comment4 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Hi. Thanks for the update. Your article mentions CND, so it indirectly was pointing the finger at them for producing a product that contains the chemical Methyl Pyrrolidone (n-MP). Your report was written at a later date than when CND Shellac had reported they had removed the chemical, so your information or research wasn't fully informed. Thanks for altering your article. I am in no way affiliated with the company. I was doing research myself into what chemicals are in their products before purchasing them and stumbled across your article in my search.

October 19, 2015 - 10:17am
HERWriter (reply to Anonymous)

No problem.  Interestingly, CND knows that Good Housekeeping has that paragraph in their article.  According to this link, they tried to meet with Good Housekeeping to change it but it still says it when I checked their link today.  Surprised that this mistake was not resolved now 3 years later. 

 

http://www.solessence.com/2012/03/good-houskeepings-erroneous-article-on...

October 19, 2015 - 1:35pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

CND Shellac had responded to your article and said that as of August 2011 CND Shellac does not contain the chemical Methyl Pyrrolidone (n-MP), so the reporting here is incorrect and misleading.

https://www.cnd.com/press-releases/cnd-shellac-safety

October 19, 2015 - 8:05am
HERWriter (reply to Anonymous)

Hello, thank you for your update.  My reference was based on what Good Housekeeping stated in their article.  They reported this: 

  • Shellac contains methylpyrrolidone, a chemical that is used to dissolve other chemicals. In June 2001, methylpyrrolidone was added to California's Prop 65 list of toxic chemicals as a chemical discovered to cause reproductive toxicity.

The link you posted says this:

  • As of August 2011, CND Shellac does not contain the chemical Methyl Pyrrolidone (n-MP). Prior to that, several original CND Shellac color formulations used a raw material that contained trace amounts of n-MP in the solvent. The amount of n-MP in the final formula was below 0.1%, well within safe harbor limits of California’s Prop 65.

 

I will adjust my article to reflect that and hyperlink the link you have included.  However, saying something is below allowable levels, does not mean you want to be exposed to it.  

thank for the update. 

October 19, 2015 - 9:22am
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