Hide This

FREEHER HealthToolkit

HER Health Toolkit

Sign up for EmpowHER updates and you'll receive our
FREE HER Health Toolkit

Gallstones

Get Email Updates

Related Topics

Gallstones Guide

Christine Jeffries

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.

ASK

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!

Trapped: The Effects of Gallstones Stuck to Your Bile Ducts

By Katie Meakem
 
Rate This
Trapped: The Effects of Gallstones Stuck to Your Bile Ducts 3 5 32
gallstones stuck on bile duct cause stomach pain, fever and chills
B-D-S/PhotoSpin

Gallstone disease is the most common gastrointestinal disease requiring hospitalization, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Most people have gallstones without even knowing it and without symptoms. Gallstone disease has an estimated $5 billion yearly medical cost, a million new cases diagnosed each year and about 800,000 performed operations.

Gender, age, obesity, diabetes, family history and ethnicity are critical risk factors in development of gallstone disease.

Gallstone disease affects the body's biliary system, which creates, transports, stores and releases bile. Bile is a thick fluid, stored in the gallbladder, which digests fat in the small intestine. If the chemical balance of bile contains too much of any of its components, especially cholesterol, crystals form and can harden into stones.

The size of gallstones ranges from as small as a grain of sand to as large as a golf ball. Thus, one large stone can form in the gallbladder, or hundreds.

There are two types of gallstones: cholesterol and pigment stones.

Cholesterol stones are associated with bile that contains an overabundance of cholesterol, or is "supersaturated" with cholesterol.

Pigment stones, made of bilirubin (a product of blood cells), are rarely seen in the United States. They vary in color, either black or brown, which determines location of the stones. Usually, black pigment stones remain in the gallbladder, while brown pigment stones lodge in bile ducts.

Many of those with gallstones have no symptoms and don’t need treatment, says Johns Hopkins. Gallstones can cause problems by lodging in bile ducts, stopping the flow of bile or digestive enzymes, and causing symptoms such as severe abdominal pain, vomiting, inflammation and infection.

There are many other conditions that cause similar symptoms to gallstones, including heartburn, stomach flu and food poisoning.

The most common symptom of gallstones is pain in the stomach area. The pain may occur after meals and make it hard to get comfortable. Moving around does not make the pain go away. About 1 to 5 hours of continuous pain is common, according to WebMD.com.

Add a Comment4 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

I really feel for people who have to undergo gallbladder surgery, especially removal. Yowch. I got close myself at one time. Good article, thank you.

- Sarah, gallstonetreatment.org

December 18, 2012 - 10:02am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Anonymous)

could you tell us a bit more about your experience?? . I think im dealing with this issue (not 100% sure yet tho) What did you do to avoid the surgery ?? etc etc

February 4, 2013 - 10:55pm
evecharlton

According to a study reported by American College of Physicians-small gallstones (smaller than 5mm) are more acute and can increase the risk for acute pancreatitis. In such condition, doctors advise for immediate surgery. However, if there is no severe pain, gallbladder miracle cleanse is effective that is described in Moritz's book . This home-based treatment really works in getting rid of these disease-causing stones and reclaiming health.

December 15, 2012 - 12:49am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Nicely explained. I would also like to introduce this new concept with only gallstones removed instead of the whole gall bladder itself.

This has been tested already and a single person already had a step by step experience. whatisgallstone.com

November 29, 2012 - 12:10pm
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Improved

1794 Health

Changed

695 Lives

Saved

556 Lives
5 lives impacted in the last 24 hrs Learn More

Take Our Featured Health Poll

Do your teens have their own cellphones?:
View Results