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Controlling Post-Menopausal Weight Gain

By Lynette Summerill HERWriter
 
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Controlling Post-Menopausal Weight Gain 3 5 33
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When it comes to shedding unwanted pounds—weight and body fat—post-menopausal women who diet and do aerobic exercise together get the most bang for their buck, according to a new study by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center.

The majority of women in the study who improved their diet and exercised regularly were the biggest losers, shedding an average of nearly 11 percent of their starting weight, which exceeded the study's goal of a 10 percent reduction.

Ann McTiernan, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Prevention Center and a member of the Hutchinson Center's Public Health Sciences Division, led the year-long study involving 439 overweight-to-obese, sedentary, postmenopausal Seattle-area women, ages 50 to 75.

McTiernan said postmenopausal women were the focus of the study since that’s a group that experiences particularly high rates of overweight and obesity.

“We were surprised at how successful the women were," McTiernan said. "Even though this degree of weight loss may not bring an obese individual to a normal weight, losing even this modest amount of weight can bring health benefits such as a reduced risk of diabetes, heart disease and many types of cancer.”

Study participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups: an exercise-only group, diet-only group, diet and exercise group, and a no intervention group. At the end of the intervention, the researchers found the women in the exercise-only group lost, on average, 4.4 pounds as compared to an average weight loss of 15.8 pounds among women in the diet-only group. The non-intervention group on average lost less than a pound – a statistically insignificant decrease.

Women who reducing calories by cutting fat intake and boosting the consumption of low-calorie foods and did moderate-intensity aerobic exercise regularly achieved the greatest weight loss. On average, these women shed an average of 10.8 percent of their starting weight (with a mean weight loss of 19.8 pounds). Two-thirds of the women in this group achieved the study goal of losing at least 10 percent of their starting weight.

McTiernan says you don't need to be an athlete to get the exercise you need.

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Anonymous

I'm at my late 40's and losing weight is definitely almost impossible. I have been fond of aerobics. I do brisk walks daily. I watch what I eat but sadly, I am still overweight. Maybe it's true that when a person get's older, losing weight is difficult, that's what I've been told. I am planning to take pills as a last resort. I hate medicines and as much as possible, I'd love not to take anything. I am aware that being overweight increases the risk for health complications like hypertension, diabetes, etc.. Having said that, I am almost near of considering a diet pill for weight loss. I've done some internet reading and I've found this Prescopodene a real eye-catcher. A friend also uses this and she's doing great with her weight loss journey. So why not give it a try?..

June 30, 2013 - 6:46pm
TheBoldBlend

I lose weight quickly from diet alone but the benefits of exercise can't be denied. Increasing activity slowly is best in my opinion so that one's appetite doesn't go crazy.

November 16, 2011 - 6:45pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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