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Stages of Pregnancy: Second Trimester, Weeks 13 - 28

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Most women find the second trimester of pregnancy easier than the first. But it is just as important to stay informed about your pregnancy during these months.

You might notice that symptoms like nausea and fatigue are going away. But other new, more noticeable changes to your body are now happening. Your abdomen will expand as the baby continues to grow. And before this trimester is over, you will feel your baby beginning to move!

As your body changes to make room for your growing baby, you may have:

- Body aches, such as back, abdomen, groin, or thigh pain

- Stretch marks on your abdomen, breasts, thighs, or buttocks

- Darkening of the skin around your nipples

- A line on the skin running from belly button to pubic hairline

- Patches of darker skin, usually over the cheeks, forehead, nose, or upper lip. Patches often match on both sides of the face. This is sometimes called the mask of pregnancy.

- Numb or tingling hands, called carpal tunnel syndrome

- Itching on the abdomen, palms, and soles of the feet.(Call your doctor if you have nausea, loss of appetite, vomiting, jaundice or fatigue combined with itching. These can be signs of a serious liver problem.)

- Swelling of the ankles, fingers, and face. (If you notice any sudden or extreme swelling or if you gain a lot of weight really quickly, call your doctor right away. This could be a sign of preeclampsia.)

For more resources on pregnancy click here.

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EmpowHER Guest

Pre-eclampsia is very dangerous and has no Pre pregnancy signs and symptoms, but most symptoms are seen after 20 weeks and need to consult doctor frequntly. high blood pressure and protein in the urine are the two common symptoms together are the real giveaway that pre-eclampsia is present.

November 7, 2012 - 5:54am
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