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Where You Live and Vitamin D

By Expert HERWriter
 
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 where you live affects how much vitamin D you get Evgeniya Uvarova/PhotoSpin

Where you live impacts your vitamin D levels. Knowing your vitamin D level is essential for your long-term drugless strategy to prevent cancer and other chronic conditions like multiple sclerosis (MS), diabetes, chronic coughing, high blood pressure and the bending over and/or collapse of your spine, otherwise known as Dowager’s Hump. If you have ever taken the 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D test, levels I like to see my practice members would be at least 40; anything less can result in chronic back pain, colds and even cancer.

Your body has been designed so that it is nearly impossible to get vitamin D toxicity from sunshine exposure – excessive levels are destroyed.

So, the question is: Do you need to supplement with vitamin D?

My answer is, you do not require supplementation if your body is exposed to UV-B rays without the use of a sun blocker that has the number eight SPF or more. You might be in the sun, but if your arms and legs are covered, and you have a blocker and hat on your face, you are basically receiving no vitamin D benefit. You will also not receive the benefit of sun from a window or a tanning bed. You need the real thing — sunshine! It also makes a difference how old you are and where you live. Individuals over 70 will only create about one-fourth of vitamin D from the sun compared to someone in their twenties. Studies have shown those over 60 who are in the sun 15 to 20 minutes a couple times a week between 11am and 2pm when the sun produces the most D should be able to generate the vitamin D needed to support optimal health: I mentioned our 2013 "Know Your Numbers" July Focus article, be mindful of the times you are in the sun. Between 11am to 2pm is the best time to get the vitamin D rays, but if you are watching the amount of sun you are getting you may want to avoid this time or dress appropriately.

Vitamin D is produced, in simple terms, from exposing the cholesterol in your skin to the UV-B rays.

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EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

I very much doubt the statement.
"Studies have shown those over 60 who are in the sun 15 to 20 minutes a couple times a week between 11am and 2pm when the sun produces the most D should be able to generate the vitamin D needed to support optimal health"
That amount of time provides enough vitamin D to have a minimal level for a young person who is at the equator AND young
AND not obese
AND has light skin
AND it is summer
AND has lots of skin exposed to the sun
AND is lying down
AND is not wearing sunscreen.
Data at http://vitamindwiki.com/tiki-index.php?page_id=1689

July 24, 2014 - 6:55pm
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