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Depression During the Holiday Season

By Dr. Carrie Jones Expert HERWriter
 
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feeling depressed in the holiday season
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As 2012 winds down to a close, it is the season for celebrating friends and family, festive atmospheres and the holiday spirit. For many, this time of year brings people close together as they bond through work parties, family events and gift exchanges.

But for some, the December season marks a time of sadness and withdrawal, especially for those who experience depression. Regardless as to whether or not the season is too overwhelming or marks an anniversary of something significant, it is important to know there are options for help.

Everyone has felt depressed at some point in their lives. It is normal to feel sad or down for short periods of time for specific reasons. But when the blues start to take over someone’s life, it is time to seek help.

True depression often interferes with eating, sleeping, interacting with friends and family, and enjoying life.

Symptoms include feeling sad, down, overwhelmed, hopeless, dark and despairing. There may be problems concentrating, problems sleeping (or vice versa -- sleeping all the time), loss of appetite (or stress-eating), withdrawal, low energy, feeling guilty and more.

People may not want to engage with their families, they find shopping overwhelming, they do not want to get out of bed, going to parties seems like a chore. They may find themselves fighting with or avoiding their children and significant others.

Help is available but it is important to recognize the symptoms and realize that it is okay to seek support.

Talk to those around you. Talk with your health care provider, your counselor, your spouse, your church leader, your best friend or your mom.

Seek support groups online and realize that you are not alone. Seek support groups within your area as local community centers and churches often offer classes or sessions in a group setting.

If you are feeling blue because you are alone, the holiday season is a great time for volunteering!

Consider offering your services to play with animals at the shelter, work at the food bank, collect clothes for the homeless, wrap toys for children in need, or serve food for a church.

Add a Comment1 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Depression is such a bad thing .Your post about it is very meaningful.

December 27, 2012 - 11:56am
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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