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Harvest Antioxidants for a Sweeter November

By Joanne Sgro-Killworth HERWriter
 
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during November enjoy the harvest for National Sweet Potato Month
Jaimie Duplass/PhotoSpin

Options for harvesting nutrient-rich foods in the fall are abundant. So it is no wonder that November has been chosen to be National Sweet Potato Month.

According to the United States Sweet Potato Council, sweet potatoes are “A powerhouse of nutrition, and are bursting with beta carotene (vitamin A), high in vitamin C, a good sources of fiber as well as fat-free and cholesterol-free.”

The council reported that the American Heart Association has also certified the sweet potato to be low in saturated fat and cholesterol.

“The sweet potato has taken top honors in two surveys of the nutritional benefits of vegetables. And, when eaten with the skin, it has more fiber than oatmeal. One medium (4 ounce) sweet potato, baked with the skin, has about four times the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of Vitamin A and almost half the recommendation for Vitamin C.”

According to LiveStrong.com, “Antioxidants abound in sweet potatoes, which also have anti-inflammatory properties.”

The site offers advice on the types of sweet potatoes and how they should be prepared. “Choose organically-grown sweet potatoes whenever possible and eat them with their skin, which contains nutrients. Conventionally-grown sweet potatoes are often treated post-harvest and should be peeled before eating. “

Sweet Potato Pancakes

• ½ tsp. stevia powder
• 2 eggs, beaten
• 1 medium sweet potato, cooked and mashed
• 1 tbsp. of ground almonds or almond meal
• dash of cinnamon

Combine all ingredients in bowl and mix to a batter consistency.
Spoon onto hot, lightly greased griddle or skillet.
Serve with sugar free syrups.
Makes 3-4 small pancakes.

Sweet Potato Walnut Pie

• 2 cups of mashed sweet potato
• ½ cup of Stevia powder
• ½ cup of raw brown sugar
• ½ tsp of vanilla
• ½ tsp of cinnamon
• ½ tsp of nutmeg
• 4 large eggs
• ½ cup of almond milk

Pie Crust:

• 1 cup of ground walnuts, mixed with 2 tbsp. butter and raw brown sugar

Press firmly into pie plate.

Combine all other ingredients together in mixing bowl and fill pie crust.
Bake at 350 degrees for about 50 minutes.

Add a Comment1 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

You should also check out sweet potato fries recipe. Sweet potato is fantastic for people who cannot tolerate nightshades, which is people with auto immune disorders. One such auto immune disorder is psoriasis, and it is very common for psoriasis sufferers to suffer reactions to nightshade foods such as the white potatoes or tomatoes.

I have been controlling my psoriasis through diet and maybe checkout this link that compares all the best psoriasis diets which includes eating the mighty sweet potato - http://bestdietforpsoriasis.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-psoriasis-diet-tre...

November 28, 2013 - 4:09pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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