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Enough with the Digestive Ads

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Digestive health seems to be all we hear about these days. Yogurts that promise to care for our health, or juice, if the yogurt isn’t your thing. It can become a sea of options and products, each one of them promising more than the rest.

It is starting to feel like a trip to the local grocery store is more like a second trip to the doctor’s office. As empowered women it is very important to remember one small thing these words of medical wisdom; they are coming from commercials, the same thing that told us as children we needed sugary cereal and the newest Barbie toy. We aren’t kids anymore and maybe we should rethink where we’re getting advice from.

My favorite ad is the one where the woman is at home after a long day and the commercial voice comes on and tells her that having the little drink box out of the fridge will fix her right up.

Did you know that it has been clinically proven that a good solid nap anywhere from 15-90 minutes in length will do the exact same thing and naps are free and available when you are in no need to go shopping for one?

My two other favorites deal with our bathroom habits. Who said we wanted to discuss that on TV? The one with the actress interviewing women on a park bench is the most degrading thing I’ve ever seen. Women should be stronger then that. Let’s not tolerate one more ad like that until men do the same thing. If you really need the help, try a fiber tablet. Being empowered isn’t about broadcasting everything in our lives. And it isn’t about spending lots of money. It’s about sharing what we know.

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I have to say, I've had years of problems with constipation. I can swear by Activia, as this seems to be the only thing close to a laxative without harm to my body that I have taken, and it works. Being constipated is a pain in the.......

April 5, 2009 - 6:47pm
HERWriter Guide

Very true!

In the first few days when I first moved to the States, I saw literally dozens of commercials for "douching". Since I had lived in France as a youngster, my only knowledge was that it meant "shower" so I asked my friend's boyfriend what these women were talking about, running about in flowery dresses, all flowing locks and smiling because they "douched" . He laughed and explained what "douching" was (I know, a grown man telling a grown woman what it was!) and I thought it was insane. Then onto the millions of ads for yeast infections...they were everywhere.

If anyone watched daytime TV, they could be forgiven for thinking that an affliction of genital herpes allows people a fairly amazing life. There they all are - a bunch of 20 and 30-something model types, sky diving, scuba diving, mountain climbing and para-sailing. All very slender with not a blemish in sight - living in exotic locales and full of love...and all turning to the camera practically wistful about having herpes.

These are all legitimate concerns but I do agree that the commercial aspect has gone a bit awry...

April 4, 2009 - 4:27am


I couldn't agree with you more!!!

And please let me add to the list two things:

1. The seemingly unending parade of commercials about needing to go, or not being able to go, to the bathroom. Especially with all their thinly veiled visuals like plumbing and balloons.

2. The truly relentless number of commercials for erectile dysfunction medicines.

I'm not making light of these conditions at all -- I'm glad there are medicines to help. But it just seems that somewhere in between the balloons dancing at their high school reunion and the couple sitting in their separate bathtubs -- what ARE those tubs trying to tell me, anyway? -- that things have gotten a little out of hand, marketing-wise.

April 3, 2009 - 6:14pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.