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Staying Healthy in the Winter

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With all the inconveniences of winter (driving and walking on rain and ice-slicked roads, dressing in clumsy layers so you’re not too cold outside and not too warm inside, feeling weighed down by the gray skies) , your thoughts just might be going farther north – where the cold and the snow can be enjoyed on the slopes! The following are a few tips for enjoying some healthy time on that S.N.O.W.B.O.A.R.D.!
Stay away from sick people – at least 3 to 6 feet, when possible. If the passenger next to you on the plane is coughing and sneezing, and you can’t change seats, offer him a packet of tissues and turn the air vent toward him.

Never go outside without wearing a good sunscreen. The combination of high altitude and reflected light from the snow expose you to significant damaging UVA and UVB rays. Not only is sun exposure a risk for skin cancers, but it’s also a major cause of pre-mature wrinkling. (Just look at the skin of the year-long ‘ski bums’ around you – they’re probably at least 10 years younger than you’d predict by looking at the lines and crevices on their faces!)
Obtain your flu shot(s) at least two weeks before your travel, so you have time to rev up your immune system for your trip.
Wash your hands scrupulously before touching your face or eating. There are only two ways to catch a cold or the flu: by getting the virus from an ill person’s sneezing or coughing directly at you, or by his coughing into his hand and then touching a doorknob or banister which you yourself touch – picking up the virus. Once you touch your face or food with that contaminated hand, you’re well on your way to spending part of your well-deserved vacation huddled under the covers alone except for some aspirin and a cup of lukewarm chicken soup… looking wistfully out the window at the happy, healthy skiers.
Be sure to get enough sleep and fluids. Winter vacations can be physically exhausting, and your system needs enough rest for you to enjoy the next day’s activities. You also need plenty of fluids to compensate for the dry, cold air outside and the warm dry air in front of the fireplace.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.