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Vitamin D Deficiency: Lupus and Other Health Conditions

By HERWriter
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Lupus made head lines with Michael Jackson’s death, but now it has made a more positive appearance. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to lupus, so now people can have a better defense against lupus diagnosis with more knowledge.

Those who have lupus and those who are genetically predisposed to having lupus, like family members of a person with lupus, can benefit from taking vitamin D supplements, the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation states.

Their release stated that “low levels of vitamin D correlated with increased autoantibodies — proteins that attack the body’s own tissue.”

According to the Office of Dietary Supplements in the National Institutes of Health, vitamin D deficiency can also cause rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults, which can cause weak bones and muscles.

Low levels of vitamin D can also cause “heart disease, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, hypertension, arthritis, depression, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, PMS, Crohns Disease, cancer, MS and other autoimmune diseases,” according to an article on www.fightingfatigue.org.

I have personally been told and have read books stating that depression can be improved by taking vitamin D supplements. Apparently, vitamin D deficiency can cause so many other problems. Thankfully, most can be alleviated by getting the proper nutrients and treatment.

Two articles from Private MD News suggested that vitamin D deficiency could also cause Alzheimer’s disease or dementia and is linked to multiple sclerosis. In the case of dementia, there is a “link between vitamin D and various forms of cardiovascular disease and the link between cardiovascular disease and dementia,” according to the Web site. However, there has been no real investigation of a link between vitamin D deficiency and dementia, according to the article.

I have definitely seen this possible link all over health news. On the New York Times Web site, there was an article in February that sited a study from Cambridge University in England that suggested the low vitamin D levels could be linked to dementia.

Add a Comment5 Comments

EmpowHER Guest

thanks for the info... i have discovered another site... http://www.systemiclupus.com/lupus-treatments/lupus-diagnosis

July 27, 2012 - 2:39am
EmpowHER Guest

Is vitamin D the new wonder drug?! I worry living so fa north that lack of sunlight during the winter monts could be such a major factor for health. On the topic of lupsus, I also receive a newsletter from Women to Women and this last one was about lupus and menopause -- how controlling the symptoms for one can help te other. f you are anywhere past your mid 30s dealing with RA or lupus, it's a good read!!! Lessons from lupus — what an inflammatory disease can teach us about menopause (and vice versa!)

September 28, 2009 - 8:30pm

I'm a lupus patient, a marathoner, and spend a lot of time outdoors in spite of the fact that sun exposure can trigger another lupus flare up. I can't take too many supplements because they upset my stomach, and I'm lactose intolerant. So, my only choice is sun exposure.

Besides, I'd rather that than a pill or yet another multi-purpose supplement, any day. It's great if you can find something that works for you!

September 3, 2009 - 4:35pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to alysiak)

how is that working for you now? A friend of mine has lupus and is looking for essential oils for treatment right now.

February 6, 2015 - 4:27am
EmpowHER Guest

Vitamin D is soooo important, and its the only vitmain we can make in our bodies, but i think thats why we take it for granted. We simply don't/can't get enough UVB from the sun on a daily basis, plus theres the risk of skin cancer, which is why i believe so strongly in supplementing.

September 3, 2009 - 12:30pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.


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