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Alison Beaver

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How to Stop Bad Moods Before They Take Hold

By Allison ONeill
 
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You can learn how to snap out of a super bad mood and change your state. It takes a bit of practice and an ounce of self growth, but you can learn to master your moods. When you drift into a bad mood don’t forget you are also drifting into a much lower energy vibration. Call it hormones, call it being stuck in traffic, or call it dropping a kilo of yogurt all over the kitchen floor – it can be overcome.

Up until I was about 17 years old, I was an impatient and moody person. Now at the ripe old age of 24 I have slowly mellowed. I now have a better handle on my moods, my state and my brain. I’ve learned that I really am in control. If I’m in a bad mood it is not only my choice it is also my fault.

I now automatically seem to almost get outside myself and see situations from a much broader perspective. As my self-awareness and mental capabilities have grown I've gained more self control. If my computer starts locking up and I sigh (then nearly unleash an array of bad words) a red light starts flashing in my head, and I choose to conquer the mood rather than have it conquer me. I see that the situation really is not as epic as my near bad mood wants me to believe it is. This seems to happen naturally for me now – its automatic and not an effort.

I’ve noticed that the pettiest things can create a bad mood. It helps to identify the exact cause. If I’m a bit short with hubby he asks “why are you all grumpy?” I always think carefully about it and tell him the whole truth. This proves how embarrassingly easy it is to flick the mood switch. The other day my answer was “because when I was putting on my jersey the sleeves of the top I’m wearing underneath got all rolled up and it took ages for me to get my other sleeves up so I could pull the other ones down again” (!!!) This was classic – and really not enough reason to be grumpy. When I can see how silly the cause of the mood is, curbing it becomes easy. I will not allow myself to be in a big grump just because my sleeves got rolled up!

Often an ‘overload’ can make you grumpy - when one thing adds to another......

Add a Comment2 Comments

Allison ONeill

I know exactly what you mean Kellie about the 'hunger anger' or 'hunger snapping' I used to be so bad at that! Luckily for me AND my husband I've got better at not letting that affect me (I must be balancing my blood sugar well now or something!).

May 13, 2009 - 9:17pm
Kellie - My Health Software

Great article. It shows that it is up to us to manage our emotions. Not always easy! I try to think: "I can't control what others say or do, but I can control how I react."

One big thing for me is hunger. If I am hungry then I am more likely to react negatively and be in a bad mood. I need to keep the glucose in my system. I am not a good dieter as a result! :)

May 13, 2009 - 6:34pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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