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Homeopathic Remedies: How Do They Work?

By Expert HERWriter
 
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Wellness related image Photo: Getty Images

A comprehensive survey of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) called the National Health Interview Survey in 2007, reported that almost five million adults and children used homeopathy in 2006. Five million people are quite a few people.

I was first introduced to homeopathy in 1992, when my mother suggested that I go see a naturopathic doctor that specialized in treating patients using nutrition, herbs and most specifically homeopathy. At that time I was in my early twenties and I didn’t have any real health problems however there were a few symptoms that bothered me from time to time.

Emotionally I was drained because I worked one of the top five consulting firms in the nation and I easily worked 80-100 hours per week. During my first visit, my doctor who later became a mentor for me, Dr. Andrea Sullivan, asked me questions about my mental, emotional, physical, relationships and spiritual life for about two hours. She wrote down many things I told her and then started flipping through this thick book as I continued to talk.

At the end of the visit she pulled out a small bottle with white pellets and asked me to open my mouth so she could pour three or four of the pellets under my tongue and she sent me home. I had no idea what she had given me I just trusted she knew what she was doing. I responded and continue to respond well to homeopathy, believing that it has wonderful healing properties when correctly prescribed.

The small pellets are called a homeopathic remedy which are sugar pellets that have minuscule amounts of either a mineral, plant or animal substances on them. The substances are made through the process of potentization.

Potentization is the step-wise dilution of a substance with a vigorous shaking process between each step of the dilution. This process causes the essence or the energy of the plant to remain as part of the final product. This essence is said to stimulate the body’s innate ability to heal.

Homeopathic Pharmacopeia of the United States (HPUS) which was written in 1938 outlines the guidelines for preparation of homeopathic remedies.

Add a Comment3 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

This whole article could have been condensed into just two words.

"It doesn't"

January 1, 2012 - 10:37am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

"The small pellets are called a homeopathic remedy which are sugar pellets that have minuscule amounts of either a mineral, plant or animal substances on them."

No, they don't. Homeopathic remedies typically contain no active ingredients because the "mineral, plant or animal substances"have been diluted out of existence. The common dilution of 30 C means 100 to the power of 30 i.e 1 part ‘ingredient’ to 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,
000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 parts water! You'd need to give 2 billion doses per second to 6 billion people for 4 billion years to deliver a single molecule of the original material to any patient. (wiki)

It is pretty obvious that the benefits you felt came from the consultation process rather than the little white pills and your promotion of homeopathy is irresponsible in the light of the tragedies that have happened because people put their faith in this non-medicine. Here are a few examples: Cameron Ayres, Gloria Thomas, Janeza Podgorsek, Penelope Dingle.

"This process causes the essence or the energy of the plant to remain as part of the final product. This essence is said to stimulate the body’s innate ability to heal."

Absolute garbage - shame on you.

Skepticat_UK

December 28, 2011 - 4:58am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Anonymous)

I agree, Skepticat_UK. Homeo is thoroughly debunked.

-r.c.

December 28, 2011 - 8:41am
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.